Last edited by Mystic Seaport Museum
12.05.2021 | History

6 edition of Voyaging - U.S. history through its maritime experience. found in the catalog.

Voyaging - U.S. history through its maritime experience.

Through U.S. history experience. - Voyaging its maritime

Through U.S. history experience. - Voyaging its maritime

  • 1911 Want to read
  • 838 Currently reading

Published by Rand in Mystic Seaport Museum .
Written in English

    Places:
  • United States
    • Subjects:
    • Mystic Seaport Museum

    • Microfiche. White Plains, N.Y. : Kraus International Publications, 1987. 1 microfiche. (Kraus Curriculum Development Library ; SOC 7-042).

      StatementMystic Seaport Museum
      PublishersMystic Seaport Museum
      Classifications
      LC Classifications1985
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxvi, 139 p. :
      Number of Pages92
      ID Numbers
      ISBN 10-
      Series
      1-
      2Kraus curriculum development library -- SOC 7-042.
      3

      - File Size: 2MB.


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Voyaging - U.S. history through its maritime experience. by Mystic Seaport Museum Download PDF EPUB FB2

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